Category: Business

Reputation Management

How to show up for your customers when they need you most.

Your company’s social media is the first place customers go to vent if something goes wrong. At PeakActivity, we make it the first place they go to celebrate.

We help partners put reputation management systems in place to meet and exceed customer expectations, increasing brand loyalty, favorability, and long-term profitability. The questions we help answer are familiar to all of us: How do we respond to customer questions? How are issues escalated? If a complaint comes in, where does it go? But their answers have a profound impact on customer and employee satisfaction. 

Case Study: Eyewear Brand

Eyewear Brand, had a dismal reputation with consumers, largely due to their slow response to customer feedback. Their rap sheet included everything from 0-star reviews to complaints filed with the Better Business Bureau. Upon partnership, our PeakActivity Account Manager became the brand’s first touch for customer service and audience engagement on social media. Through social listening and proactive outreach, we improved the response rate from weeks to hours and decreased customer complaints by 15%.

Case Study: Women’s Intimates BrandCase Study: Women’s Intimates Brand

Women’s Intimates Brand is another PeakActivity partner that struggled to manage its reputation with customers. Their products were limited to women with bust sizes from B to D. However, the brand targeted women of all sizes, which mistakenly led customers to believe that all sizes were available. The result? Customer feedback layered with annoyance and confusion. We took a holistic approach to help our partner better serve their customers. Strategies included social listening, re-aligning the audience base, adjusting brand messages, and generally improving customer interactions. Women’s Intimates Brand soon began to identify specific products that were problematic for customers (and the brand’s reputation). Then, they were able to meet customer needs individually, while addressing the larger issue at hand (the products) by discontinuing certain items. With their new approach to reputation management, Women’s Intimates Brand saw a significant decrease in complaints and a substantial increase in customer satisfaction. As a result of PeakActivity’s strategic delivery, the brand’s Return on Advertising Spend increased by 73%.

Reputation Management Strategies

As our case studies show, there’s no magic bullet when it comes to navigating brand reputation on social media. That’s why we recommend a holistic approach that includes social listening, proactive outreach, fast, reactive responses, and clear operating procedures to quickly escalate and resolve customer complaints.
Women’s Intimates Brand is another PeakActivity partner that struggled to manage its reputation with customers. Their products were limited to women with bust sizes from B to D. However, the brand targeted women of all sizes, which mistakenly led customers to believe that all sizes were available. The result? Customer feedback layered with annoyance and confusion. We took a holistic approach to help our partner better serve their customers. Strategies included social listening, re-aligning the audience base, adjusting brand messages, and generally improving customer interactions. Women’s Intimates Brand soon began to identify specific products that were problematic for customers (and the brand’s reputation). Then, they were able to meet customer needs individually, while addressing the larger issue at hand (the products) by discontinuing certain items. With their new approach to reputation management, Women’s Intimates Brand saw a significant decrease in complaints and a substantial increase in customer satisfaction. As a result of PeakActivity’s strategic delivery, the brand’s Return on Advertising Spend increased by 73%.

Social Listening:

Social Listening is how brands monitor their online presence. Our social monitoring practice typically looks at:

• Brand Mentions
• Conversion Rates
• Engagement Levels
• Hashtag Usage
• Industry Trends

We also investigate Social Sentiment, meaning the attitude of consumers toward a brand. Customers expect brands to respond quickly across channels. By listening actively and responding with speed, brands can steer conversations with customers to cultivate loyalty and positive sentiment.

Proactive Outreach:

Proactive Outreach requires understanding a brand’s audience (who they are and who they could be), the competitive climate, and interacting with customers in real-time. Methods include social listening, competitive analyses, and geo-location targeting.

Reactive Communication:

Proactive Outreach requires understanding a brand’s audience (who they are and who they could be), the competitive climate, and interacting with customers in real-time. Methods include social listening, competitive analyses, and geo-location targeting.

 

Customer Interactions: A Quick How-To

Reactive Communication:

Response Time
Customers expect immediate attention. Plain and simple. Why do so many customers prefer to message a brand’s Instagram account? Because they associate it with insta-communication. Therefore, in order to address customer needs and stay competitive, responses need to be instant. (See Eyewear Brand Case Study)

Quality
When it comes to customer interactions, quality matters. People want authentic and considerate responses, even if it’s something as simple as providing store hours. Quality interactions with customers can improve brand reputation, enhance brand awareness, and even boost sales.

Consistency
Keeping up with response times requires consistent effort. Using both proactive and reactive strategies can help a brand achieve a reputation for reliability while also strengthening individual connections with consumers and cultivating brand loyalty.

Systems
With consideration of company structure and key players, different systems will work better for different businesses. Therefore, it’s important to adopt a system (or set of systems) that provide clear guidelines for reputation management.

Systems can help establish protocols for:

• Ad Management
• Influencer Partnerships
• Proactive Engagement
• Quality Assurance

Case Study: Personal Protective Equipment Brand
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Brand struggled with customer service across their social media platforms. The challenge? They lacked the clear communication systems needed to accelerate response times.

We delivered a tailored solution, creating and implementing Standard Operating Procedures, and creating a funnel to triage interventions. By engaging with PPE Brand’s audience through proactive outreach and by responding quickly to customer inquiries, PeakActivity produced rapid improvements in social reputation and a dramatic increase in followers and engagement

Customer Interactions: A Quick How-To

Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Brand struggled with customer service across their social media platforms. The challenge? They lacked the clear communication systems needed to accelerate response times. We delivered a tailored solution, creating and implementing Standard Operating Procedures, and creating a funnel to triage interventions. By engaging with PPE Brand’s audience through proactive outreach and by responding quickly to customer inquiries, PeakActivity produced rapid improvements in social reputation and a dramatic increase in followers and engagement.

Who Manages a Brand’s Reputation?

Reputation Management blends customer service, social media management, human resources, and sales. That’s why there’s rarely one specific person whose job is dedicated to addressing this important aspect of a brand. Some companies use reputation management systems, which scan channels for brand mentions and then disseminate automated replies. Still, while we agree that automation can do a lot for a business, we also know that social listening requires real people. At PeakActivity, Reputation Management is driven by a team of motivated business partners who are social-savvy and customer-oriented. We work together to leverage what works, pivot when necessary, and innovate at every opportunity. That’s how we make a difference in digital.
Read More

A/B Test: Home Page User-Generated Content

A/B Testing Results & Examples

Display User-Generated Content On Home Page

The Experiment

Short Description: Move the social media user generated carousel (UGC) below the main homepage sliders.

Hypothesis/Success Criteria: If we move the UGC carousel below the main homepage slider then we will increase customer engagement and therefore decrease bounce rate.

Supporting Data: User-generated content has a big influence on purchasing decisions.
According to Gartner’s research, 84% of millennials are likely to be influenced to make a purchase based upon user-generated content that is created by strangers

CONTROL

EXPERIEMENT



The Details

How Does It Work?

Utilizing our partner Curalate that lets you use social content and audiences to sell more effectively online. They allow us to bring social content onto our sites that inspire visitors and encourages purchases. The location of the social content displayed on site is important to the customer’s journey.

Why Are We Testing This?

Integrate images and videos from customers, influencers, partners, and our own social media accounts throughout your site to help people envision your products in their lives. Especially in the case of furniture, where design, trending styles, comfort, size, and fit are all rather difficult to display through a website.



The Results

Below is the recap of the hypothesis, success criteria, along with our go-forward recommendation the Homepage – Curalate Carousel Placement.

Hypothesis/Success Criteria: If we move the Curalate carousel below the main homepage slider then we will increase customer engagement and therefore decrease the bounce rate.

Recommendation: Based on our hypotheses, success metrics, and sample size we can say that our hypothesis was correct. We see a significant decrease in home page bounce rate when the user-generated content is below the homepage sliders. This is leading to a significant increase in the homepage click-through rate. We see no negative effect on any primary revenue KPI’s.  Our recommendation is to move the winning variant to 100%

DeviceBounce Rate DecreaseHome page Click through Rate (CTR) LiftProduct Detail Page View LiftTotal SessionsWin / Lost
All Devices-3.1% (91% Conf.)0.38% (93% Conf.)0.6% (57% Conf.)113,059Win
Read More

The Why and How of Product Images

We live in a visual world where image matters. The virtual world is no different. Photos and videos are the first things consumers see on your website. The question is, are your images compelling enough to keep them browsing, and eventually, convert?

Customers come to your site with lots of questions about your products, product features, and overall brand. They’re also wildly impatient. They expect page loads under 3 seconds and effortless, intuitive UX. And once they find what they’re looking for, they’re making faster decisions than ever. Great product photography is critical in those key decision-making moments. It tells the customer who you are, what you have to offer, and more critically if you can help them, and it all happens almost instantaneously. So, how do we create those high-quality, conversion-worthy product photos?

5 Steps to Your Best-Ever Product Photos

1. Simple Is Best: Let Your Product Shine.

Congratulations. A customer—Ella—has come to your site with questions about your product. Now, will she find the answers she’s looking for in your photography or will she bounce? Step one is basic: make sure Ella can see your product in detail by shooting it against a simple white backdrop. Showcase your products without distraction so that she can find the precise features she’s looking for. Remember, your job is to anticipate Ella’s needs before she’s even aware of them. This could mean shooting multiple angles to ensure every detail shines. Help Ella imagine what it would be like to have your product as her own and she might even convert.

2. Reinforce Your Brand with Lifestyle Photography.

Wonderful, your product photography is aces. But your customers also want to see your product in action. Use lifestyle shots to tell the story of your product, answer customer questions, and let them know what your brand is all about. Remember Ella? You’ve built some brand equity simply by answering all of her product questions—and quickly! Now’s your chance to cultivate brand loyalty by forging an emotional connection.

Are you casting your lifestyle shot? Consider your key customer personas as you select the people and places in your shot. Does your cast reflect the diversity and demography of your customers? And what does the location say about your brand?

3. Make Sure Your Lighting Is Just Right. 

When taking your product photos, don’t forget about lighting. If your product is the star, lighting is your best supporting actor. She sets up your star for success and definitely adds drama.

Natural light can be a terrific, easy, and affordable option. The sun can be a little overbearing when taking your photos outside, so it’s best to use the natural light coming through your windows to give you the perfect lighting. Your window will need to be large enough to fully light your product. If you don’t have access to a window that will provide enough light, you can shoot your product photos outside. If the light on your product is too bright or direct, try to distribute the light to better showcase your product. You may consider using a reflector. This will help you direct the light exactly where it needs to be to showcase your product for your best product photos.

Unfortunately, you can’t always depend on the sun for consistent product photography. If you’re shooting a volume of products, you’re going to need a basic studio setup. This includes a camera, white backdrop, different backgrounds, and a lightbox with two light bulbs. Pro Tip: If you can’t use natural light, use a fluorescent light bulb. These bulbs produce light that most closely resembles natural light. Fluorescent bulbs will give you that natural light look even when the sun is nowhere in sight.

4. Consistency Is Key.

The product images on your website should be similar in look and feel. For product detail images shot in studio, this means consistent backgrounds, lighting, and angles. You’ll also want to crop images so that the products are sized and scaled consistently across your site. Taken together, this consistency will help our friend Ella quickly sort through your many fantastic products, answer any lingering questions, and with any luck, finally convert.

Lifestyle shots don’t need to be quite so regimented. But remember, you worked hard to create lifestyle images that tell the story of your brand. And you want that story (and overall creative direction) to be clear and consistent as well. Consider creating a simple style guide that documents all of your image requirements for both product and lifestyle images so that you have a lodestar you can return to time and time again.

5. Optimize Your Images for Quality and Site Speed.

You’ve taken some beautiful product photos. Now it’s time to optimize them so that they look their best without slowing down your site.

JPEGs are the best option for your typical product or lifestyle photos. Optimized properly, they’re the smallest and highest-quality files. Experiment with quality levels as you save your initial images, with the goal of setting a site-wide standard. You’re trying to strike a balance between quality (meaning no noticeable deterioration in the image or obvious pixelation) and file size.

PNGs are a good option for images that have text like a logo or banner. When graphics with text lose quality, they can appear pixelated. PNGs reduce that pixelation so that your text reads as clearly as possible.

The most common mistake when doing product photography is a lack of proper equipment. To make your product shine, you will need to use the right camera, lighting, angles, and composition. Change up your background, create different perspectives, and move things around until you have the right angles. Your photos are the first thing your consumers are going to see, so make them compelling enough to result in a conversion.

Great product images tell a story. They tell your customers who you are, how you can help them and can spark a long-term relationship between you and your customer. We hope our simple steps have given you the tools to produce effective product photography and will help you chart a path towards a faster, more relevant, and compelling site.

Need help optimizing your product images?  Get in touch with us by filling out this form!

Read More